NEST
SHOWROOM
SHEFFIELD
 

  • Nest Showroom

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    High-end designer furniture retailer, Nest, invited Kiwi & Pom to redesign their showroom.  Kiwi & Pom took inspiration from local architecture and incorporated this into their use of materials, artwork and shopfit.  The nearby Parkhill development provided a striking example of 1960s Brutalist architecture, and is a development which Nest had worked on to refurbish.

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    During it's refurbishment Parkhill was stripped and left with a bare grid-like structure - images of which Kiwi & Pom used to inspire open wall partitions and an open grid ceiling structure.  Such structures served to break up the line of sight whilst maintaining a light and open environment, in addition to doubling the amount of shelving display and storage.

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    To create an industrial feel Kiwi & Pom kept the existing concrete floor but had it polished back.  It was then proposed that the interior be kept light and bright, with the use of wood to bring warmth to the space and product.  A darkened corner was created at the rear of the showroom to showcase lighting products. 

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    Kiwi & Pom chose to position the retail space at the Nest main entrance; creating a layout that would naturally lead visitors onto the showroom and finally through to the meeting area.  

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    The iconic Parkhill building in Sheffield inspired the material palette for the interior. The finishes selected were neutral and minimal to provide a clean backdrop to the products in the showroom.

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    The layout of the space allowed visitors to be met at the concierge desk before exploring the retail space and online order point – which provided access to Nest’s complete online range.

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    Kiwi & Pom designed bespoke shelving which enabled Nest to edit their interior whenever necessary, allowing the collection to be curated and accommodate additional or new pieces.

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    Kiwi & Pom proposed that the interior structures, although made of hard-wearing oak, would have a temporary nature to their design; the interior has the ability to be arranged and rearranged.  

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    Placing the meeting area at the rear of the showroom delivered a meeting space that could be private and quiet, complete with a small kitchen and enough storage to minimise disruptions to meetings or events.

Nest Showroom

High-end designer furniture retailer, Nest, invited Kiwi & Pom to redesign their showroom.

Nest liked our Falcon Pop-Up Shop at Design Junction, particularly the use of materials and the temporary nature of the shop structure.

Nest had three key aspirations for their new showroom. They wanted their new space to become a destination; and to attract designers and architects who were looking for a venue to showcase a large selection of 21st century designer furniture and lighting.  

Thirdly, Nest wanted the showroom to have a retail space in which smaller accessories could be sold.

Kiwi & Pom took inspiration from the local Sheffield architecture and incorporated this into their use of materials, artwork and shopfit.  The nearby Parkhill development provided a striking example of 1960s Brutalist architecture, a development which Nest had in fact worked on to refurbish.

During it's refurbishment Parkhill was completely stripped back, leaving only the bare grid-like structure of the building - images of which Kiwi & Pom used to inspire open wall partitions and an open grid ceiling structure.   Grey-scaled and pixelated photographic images of local Sheffield landmark Parkhill were created as a nod to the architectural reference. 

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