Slow Tech
Products for
London Design
Festival

  • Slow Tech Products

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    Kiwi & Pom were invited to participate in Slow Tech – an exhibition about downtime in a digital age for the London Design Festival. As well as designing the space, Kiwi & Pom designed two ‘downtime’ concepts that invited visitors to take ‘time out’ from electronic devices, instead interacting with products that bridged the virtual and physical world.

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    Kiwi & Pom created the Flip Dot - a large scale text message machine - as a response to the antisocial act of text messaging in social situations. The Flip Dot explores whether texting could be a more communal activity, whereby a single message is enjoyed by many.

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    Rather than an alert or vibration, Kiwi & Pom wanted a more analogue sound to signify a message. The Flip Dot is an evolution of the classic Flip Flap display (typically used to display public information) and creates a nostalgic ‘clacking’ noise as the dots flip to form words and messages.

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    Kiwi & Pom found a factory in Poland that still manufactured Flip Dots and set about making a large-format text message machine in the studio. The final machine is (h) 890 × (w) 940 mm and displays the date, time and any message sent to its sim card.

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    The Flip Dot became the centre-piece of the Slow Tech exhibition and now takes pride of place in the Kiwi & Pom studio.

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    The KP Radio was designed to combat the overwhelming choice faced when listening to music on audio streaming services.

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    In keeping with the theme of simplifying music libraries, Kiwi & Pom looked to create a clean, simple and pure aesthetic that took inspiration from the era of non-digital music.

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    Rather than a screen or digital interface for searching by band or album name, users rotate an exaggerated mechanical dial to choose songs by mood – such as excited, tense, sleepy, etc.

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    The dial, which makes up one third of the overall object, can also be detached from the main speaker unit to become an over-sized remote control.

Slow Tech Products

For the London Design Festival, Kiwi & Pom were invited to participate in Slow Tech – an exhibition about downtime in a digital age. As well as designing the space (see Slow Tech, Interiors) Kiwi & Pom designed two ‘downtime’ concepts that invited visitors to slowly take time out from electronic devices and instead interact with products that bridged the virtual and physical world.

The idea for Flip Dot came about as a response to the antisocial act of text messaging in social situations – and explores whether texting could be a more communal activity, whereby a single message could be enjoyed by many.

Rather than an alert or vibration to signify receipt of a message, Kiwi & Pom wanted a more analogue sound, one that might attract attention and be more low-tech. The Flip Dot is an evolution of the classic Flip Flap display (typically used to display ever-changing public information) and creates a nostalgic ‘clacking’ noise as the dots flip to form words and messages.

Kiwi & Pom found a factory in Poland that still manufactured Flip Dots and then set about making a large-format text message machine in the studio. 

The final machine is (h) 890 × (w) 940 mm and displays the date, time and any message sent to its sim card. The Flip Dot became the centre-piece of the Slow Tech exhibition and now takes pride of place in the Kiwi & Pom studio.

The second product created for the show was a radio designed to combat the overwhelming choice faced by those wanting to listen to music on audio streaming services.

Rather than a screen or digital interface for searching by band name or album, users rotate an exaggerated mechanical dial to choose songs by mood – such as excited, tense, sleepy, etc. In keeping with the theme of simplifying vast music libraries, Kiwi & Pom looked to create a clean, pure, simple aesthetic that took inspiration from the era of non-digital music. The dial, which makes up one third of the overall object, can also be detached from the main speaker unit to become an over-sized remote control.

Kiwi & Pom also designed the exhibition concept, which took the form of a mock rehabilitation clinic for the digitally addicted.

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