Garden Museum
Café Kiosk Concept
London
 

  • Garden Museum

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    The Garden Museum was established in 1977 and is located in the ancient church of St Mary’s in Lambeth.  It hosts numerous talks and exhibitions on the subject of gardens and garden design and it also boasts a beautiful knot garden in which lies the tomb of John Tradescant, the first great gardener and plant-hunter in Britain.

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    In researching the museum and the history of John Tradescant the Elder, we learnt that he was believed to be the first person to have cultivated a pineapple in Britain – a fruit which symbolises hospitality.

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    We wondered whether it was possible to make a structure inspired by this form and symbolism that could provide shelter for visitors to the garden, space for eating and events and also act as a signpost for the museum.

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    The serving pavilion, inspired by gilded pineapples is constructed using an aluminium skinned polypropylene wrapped in a gold foil to give a mirrored finish in order to reflect the trees and flowers in the garden.

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    The final design for the pavilions takes their geometric cues from the form of a pineapple, highly rationalised in order to be fabricated from repeating templates that sit on a chromed steel framework.

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    Internally, both structures are completed with plywood which is also used to make bespoke tables, seating and servery counter.

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    A planted herb chandelier fills the ceiling of the eating pavilion, bringing the outdoors inside and filling the air with the aroma of rosemary, thyme and mint.

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    To allow views out and create a beacon at night, the eating pavilion is constructed from clear polycarbonate.

Garden Museum

In February 2012, Kiwi & Pom took a field trip to the Garden museum in Southwark to explore the site and see if they could work together in some way. The result was the design of a pavilion structure inspired by one of the world’s most historically expensive and luxurious fruits.

The Garden Museum was established in 1977 and is located in the ancient church of St Mary’s in Lambeth.  It hosts numerous talks and exhibitions on the subject of gardens and garden design and it also boasts a beautiful knot garden in which lies the tomb of John Tradescant, the first great gardener and plant-hunter in Britain.

One of the wonderful things about the Garden Museum is that it has a café serving the most delicious homemade food, and that visitors can enjoy this amazing food in the setting of a beautiful knot garden.  That is, when its not raining.

After introducing Kiwi & Pom and discussing the museum with its director it became clear there was a need for a structure that could provide shelter for café customers during inclement weather.

Kiwi & Pom began working up ideas for the structure. In researching the museum and the history of John Tradescant the Elder, we learnt that he was believed to be the first person to have cultivated a pineapple in Britain – a fruit which symbolises hospitality. We wondered whether it was possible to make a structure inspired by this form and symbolism that could provide shelter for visitors to the garden, space for eating and events and also act as a signpost for the museum. Rather than site the structure in the Knot Garden at the rear of the museum and risk it being hidden, we proposed to construct two pavilions – one for serving and one for eating – at the front of the museum, visible to anyone passing by the busy Lambeth Palace Road.

The final design for the pavilions takes their geometric cues from the form of a pineapple, highly rationalised in order to be fabricated from repeating templates that sit on a chromed steel framework. To allow views out and create a beacon at night, the eating pavilion is constructed from clear polycarbonate.  The serving pavilion, inspired by gilded pineapples is constructed using an aluminium skinned polypropylene wrapped in a gold foil to give a mirrored finish in order to reflect the trees and flowers in the garden. Internally, both structures are completed with plywood which is also used to make bespoke tables, seating and servery counter.  A planted herb chandelier fills the ceiling of the eating pavilion, bringing the outdoors inside and filling the air with the aroma of rosemary, thyme and mint.

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